The Garden City

The last days of winter on the streets of 1920s Manhattan — remnants of snow and slush mixed with coal soot and car exhaust — were quickly forgotten with the advent of spring. The New Yorker (March 26, 1927) turned its attention to more pleasant diversions including the annual Madison Square Garden flower show…

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March 26, 1927 cover by unknown artist.

…and to the people it attracted, rendered in illustrations for “The Talk of the Town” by Alice Harvey…

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Backyard gardens and window boxes also welcomed spring, as did a two-part feature that offered helpful advice to amateur urban gardeners. An excerpt:

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No doubt the writer saw something akin to what we can see in Frances Benjamin Johnston’s rare color photographs of backyard gardens in the early 1920s Manhattan (all photos courtesy Library of Congress):

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Turtle Bay Gardens, 227-247 East 48 Street and 228-46 East 49 Street. View east to common garden.
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George Hoadly Ingalls house, 154 East 78 Street.
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Laura Stafford Stewart house, 205 West 13th Street.
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“Jones Wood” townhouses, north terrace fountain.

 * * *

Let’s look at a couple of advertisements from March 26 issue…why fight the crowds on the commuter train? — you could live a life of ease and convenience in the new Tudor City…

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…and perhaps you could afford a car almost as prestigious as a Cadillac…introducing the new LaSalle, manufactured by Cadillac but priced lower to “satisfy that other great market”…

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For industrial design buffs, the 1927 LaSalle in many ways marked the beginning of modern American automotive styling. The LaSalle line, designed by Harley Earl, would be eliminated in 1940, but Earl’s career as the man in charge of design at General Motors would last into the late 1950s.

Earl was a pioneer in auto design, one of the first to use modeling clay to develop forms for cars. He also established an “Art and Color Section at GM,” a radical notion at a time when American automobile manufacturers paid little attention to the appearance of automobile bodies, which were merely engineered for functionality and cost.

Earl also pioneered the idea of planned obsolescence in cars (which he termed “Dynamic Obsolescence”) in which annual model changes were used to induce sales. It was Earl who convinced GM to build a sports car–the Corvette–and it was Earl who also oversaw the introduction of the tail fin — culminating in the 1959 Cadillac — the year he retired from GM.

In the course of just 32 years, Earl’s designs went from this…

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Harley Earl at the wheel of a 1927 LaSalle Series 303 Roadster. (carbodydesign.com)

…to this…

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Harley Earl’s swan song, a 1959 Cadillac Eldorado. (photobucket.com)

Next Time: Dinosaurs of Upper West Side…

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Published by

David O

I read and write about history from the perspective that history is not some artifact from the past but a living, breathing condition we inhabit every moment of our lives, or as William Faulkner once observed, "The past is never dead. It's not even past." I read original source materials, such as every issue of The New Yorker, not only as a way to understand a time from a particular perspective, but to also use the source as an aggregator of various historic events. I welcome comments, criticisms, corrections and insights as I stumble along through the century.

One thought on “The Garden City”

  1. Wonderful photos of the backyard gardens! And also that sweet row of tulips leading to the door of the Stewart house1
    As for the adverts. My mother (diner at the Crillon), lived in Tudor City before and during WWII. (except for her year in Little Rock, Arkansas when my father was stationed there). She adored her little apartment, and spent her evenings there reading books that my father was reading across the ocean in France at the same time…. She also taught at Central Commercial High School as a substitute teacher, which meant mostly reading books while she gave the students tasks at their desks that would keep them fairly quiet, while she got on with her studies.

    Like

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